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ELLIS FAAS

MAKEUP ARTIST

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ellis Faas is “one of the most influential makeup artists of her generation” says Vogue Paris.  Ellis went on an unknown journey that took her to her destiny.  Wanting to become a photographer, she built up her portfolio, making herself her own model by experimenting with makeup to create a different look; stumbling onto, which she had no idea, her passion.  Following her passion, little did she know she would eventually meet someone who clearly saw her talent. World renowned photographer Mario Testino came to the Netherlands to do a shoot for L’Uomo Vogue, that is when  Photographer Mario saw   Ellis’s portfolio and was taken with her unique style, and that is how  destination met destiny.

Ellis became the leading makeup artist for fashion shows around the globe, because of  her ability to create and design makeup with use of flamboyant shades and feminine soft colors, thus attracting attention of many well-known fashion photographers and designers.  Some of these fashion photographers and designers that worked with Ellis are:

Photographers: Patrick Demarchilier, Karl Lagerfeld, Terry Richardson, Vincent Peters, Jean-Paul Goude, and Tom Munro.

Fashion Designers: Chanel, Yves Saint-Laurent, Fendi, Giorigio Armani, Jean Paul Gaultier, Dolce & Gabbana, and Viktor & Rolf for H&M.

Ellis Faas for second time in a row, won the Elle Style Awards 2009 for Best HP Make-up.   She was recently featured in W Magazine online article. 

 In February 2009 Ellis Faas launched her make-up line, which  can be purchased through  her online store and throughout stores in various countries.

I am delighted to be given the opportunity to ask Ellis Faas  few questions about her new make-up line.


Exclusively Fashion Magazine: I believe that timing is everything; when did you know that it was the right time to start your makeup line?

Ellis Faas: A few years ago, I had a contract to design the makeup for the brand Biotherm.  I suggested lots and lots of ideas, but I then noticed that for an existing brand that is part of a conglomerate like in this case L’Oreal, it is difficult to start all over, get back to the basis and start something revolutionary. So when I got the idea for this packaging concept (which will make carrying around the makeup and then find it in your bag a piece of cake), I decided that the only way to do it is by myself – from scratch. And I believe that more and more consumers are looking for products that have been made with passion by a small company instead of something driven by marketing, so that makes the actual timing ideal.

EFM: Where did the idea come from to name the Ellis lips creamy, milky, and glazed?  The names suit perfectly.

EF: I’m glad to hear that. All products in our brand are and will be liquid, including the eye shadows, blushers et cetera. So when I was thinking how to call the different textures of Ellis Lips, it really needed to be related to something fluid and also maybe something that you could eat, since it’s the mouth. The difference between Cream and Milk was exactly what I was looking for.



EFM: What was the process like to get your makeup line out into the market?

EF: Difficult! At least from the production side: there are so many different parties involved, design, packaging, printers, production of the bulk, filling – and if one is delayed, everything is delayed. Fortunately the type of shops where we want to sell (small, exclusive “boutiques”) have been very enthusiastic so far. And apparently there are many stories to the brand and its concepts for colours and packaging that the press likes to dive into it.

EFM: What is the first tip that you can give women when applying their makeup?

EF: Follow your own taste and don’t let anyone tell you what “your colour” is or isn’t. Also try things that at first glance don’t seem obvious. We have an orange lipstick for instance that some people (including those in the lab!) are afraid of until they try it and see how wonderfully it looks. So just experiment.

EFM: Out of the three lipsticks, milky, creamy, and glazed; which one do you find yourself wearing daily?

EF: I am not really someone who goes for shiny lips, so even though our Glazed Lips don’t get sticky like normal glosses which I absolutely dislike, I wear Creamy or Milky, depending on my mood.



EFM: With so many makeup products out in the market; your rich shades are an “eye popper”.  Was that the idea that you were going for?

EF: Not really, at least not as a preconceived idea. I just made the range to consist of all my favourite colours that were not available on the market yet. So whenever I wanted these colours for a show or shoot, I mixed them especially for the occasion. After the range was final, I realized that I based all colours on the colours that are already present in the human body (like the blue of a vein, the green of an old bruise, and like the blood-red of Ellis Red), so even though they might be “eye poppers”, they appear to suit everyone – whether you are a 16-year-old white girl or an 80-year old black grandmother.

EFM: What brought on the idea of using a 3-D effect?

EF: To be honest, it was not really something that I chose or specifically looked for; it was just an effect that was included in the formula that I liked best.

EFM: When will your makeup line hit the United States?

EF: At the moment we are talking to a retailer who has quite a few shops in the US, and they are planning to launch there after the Summer, when Ellis Lips has been expanded by Ellis Eyes (shadows, mascaras, eyeliners) and Ellis Skin (foundations, concealers, blushers etc). Until then, people can visit our web shop, because we ship all over the world.

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Interview by Rochell “E” James

 


   

 

 
 

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